Your question: What do I need to know about cataract surgery?

During cataract surgery, the clouded lens is removed, and a clear artificial lens is usually implanted. In some cases, however, a cataract may be removed without implanting an artificial lens. Surgical methods used to remove cataracts include: Using an ultrasound probe to break up the lens for removal.

Do and don’ts after cataract surgery?

Don’t drive on the first day following surgery. Don’t do any heavy lifting or strenuous activity for a few weeks. Immediately after the procedure, avoid bending over to prevent putting extra pressure on your eye. If at all possible, don’t sneeze or vomit right after surgery.

How long does it take to recover from a cataract operation?

Cataract surgery involves replacing the cloudy lens inside your eye with an artificial one. It has a high success rate in improving your eyesight. It can take 2 to 6 weeks to fully recover from cataract surgery.

What should I know before having cataract surgery?

You’ll need a complete eye exam in preparation for cataract surgery. You may also need special eye tests, blood tests, and other tests. Your doctor will give you specific instructions about taking medications and when to stop all food and drink before surgery. You will also need to arrange a ride home after surgery.

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How painful is cataract surgery?

Cataract surgery is not painful. While patients are awake during surgery, there is little or no discomfort involved. A mild sedative may be administered before the surgery, which calms the nerves, and eye drops are used to numb the eye.

Can I read and watch TV after cataract surgery?

You can read or watch TV right away, but things may look blurry. Most people are able to return to work or their normal routine in 1 to 3 days. After your eye heals, you may still need to wear glasses, especially for reading.

How do you shower after cataract surgery?

You can take a shower or bath 24 hours after your surgery. Do not get water or soap in your eye. Keep your eye closed while you shower. Use a clean washcloth every time and normal tap water to clean secretions from your lashes or the corner of your eye.

What activities should be avoided after cataract surgery?

Avoid heavy lifting, exercise, and other strenuous activities. Exercise can cause complications while you’re healing. You’re at higher risk of having an accident if you’re doing anything physically taxing.

How long does it take for blurriness to go away after cataract surgery?

According to the American Optometric Association, approximately 90 percent of patients report having better vision after having cataract surgery. After cataract surgery, it’s normal for your vision to be blurry at first as your eye recovers. The blurred vision will typically go away within a few days.

What is the most common complication of cataract surgery?

A long-term consequence of cataract surgery is posterior capsular opacification (PCO). PCO is the most common complication of cataract surgery. PCO can begin to form at any point following cataract surgery.

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Will I be asleep during cataract surgery?

You may be awake or asleep during the surgery depending upon the amount of sedation given, but you will not be uncomfortable. There is no pain during cataract surgery. You will feel cool water flowing over your eye at times, and perhaps a painless touch around the eye or a very light pressure sensation, but no pain.

How can I relax after cataract surgery?

5 Calming Ways to Prepare for Cataract Surgery

  1. Talk to Your Doctor. Asking for a thorough explanation of what will happen during cataract surgery, and what is expected of you, can do wonders to calm your nerves. …
  2. Practice Breathing. …
  3. Eat a Good Meal. …
  4. Get a Good Night’s Sleep. …
  5. Wear Your Most Comfortable Clothing.

What are the side effects after cataract surgery?

Side effects are rare from cataract surgery, but some things that could happen are:

  • Eye infection or swelling.
  • Bleeding.
  • Retinal detachment — the breaking away of a layer of tissue at the back of your eye that senses light.
  • Drooping eyelid.
  • Temporary rise in eye pressure 12-24 hours after surgery.